Lockheed Martin

Lockheed Martin Corporation, a major U.S. diversified company with core businesses in aerospace products – including aircraft, launch vehicles, satellites and defense systems – and other advanced technology systems and services. About half of the company’s annual sales are to the U.S. Department of Defense.

Lockheed Martin is also a leading contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). It was formed in 1995 through the merger of Lockheed Corporation and Martin Marietta Corporation, then the second and third largest U.S. defense contractors. In 1996, the new company continued to grow with the acquisition of the defense electronics and systems businesses of Loral Corporation (itself made up of nine separate aerospace and defense units of major U.S. companies such as IBM, Xerox, and Ford). It is headquartered in Bethesda, Maryland.

Lockheed Martin manufactures the F-16 Fighting Falcon multirole fighter, the C-130 Hercules military transport, and the P-3 Orion maritime reconnaissance aircraft, among others. Other projects include the F-22 Raptor stealth fighter in cooperation with the Boeing Company and the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) in competition with Boeing. The company also performs upgrades, modifications and overhauls of its older aircraft. In space, Lockheed Martin builds the Titan IV, the largest U.S. launch vehicle; the Atlas commercial families of expendable launchers; the Centaur upper-stage missile; the Trident II submarine-launched ballistic missile; and smaller tactical missile systems for aircraft and ground-based

platforms. It also manufactures military satellites (e.g. for the Milstar communications satellite system) and numerous scientific, weather and telecommunications satellites. Lockheed Martin supplies the external fuel tank for the U.S. Space Shuttle and, in a joint venture with Boeing called United Space Alliance, performs day-to-day operations and management of the Shuttle fleet for NASA. As part of International Launch Services, a joint venture formed in 1995 with Russian companies Energia and Khrunichev, it markets commercial Atlas and Proton launch services worldwide. The company also produces fire control systems, radars and other elements of the U.S. Navy’s Aegis combat system, which automatically tracks enemy targets and controls missile defenses. It is the managing contractor for Oak Ridge (Tennessee) National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico and California. In 2000, Lockheed Martin employed about 150,000 people worldwide.

Lockheed Corporation

Lockheed Corporation dates back to 1912, when Allan Loughead, his brother Malcolm, and Max Mamlock, who was then head of the Alco Cab Company, formed the Alco Hydro-Aeroplane Company to build the Loughead brothers’ seaplane model, the Model G. The company was founded in 1912. After a year The company became dormant, but in 1915 the Loughead brothers bought out the interests of other investors to gain control of the Model G, and that year successfully flew paying passengers at the Panama-Pacific Exposition in San Francisco. With their profits and capital from investors, the brothers formed the Loughhead Aircraft Manufacturing Company

In 1916. Although the F-1 flying boat was well designed, sales were poor and the company was liquidated in 1921.
Lockheed Corporation dates back to 1912, when Allan Loughead, his brother Malcolm, and Max Mamlock, who was then head of the Alco Cab Company, formed the Alco Hydro-Aeroplane Company to build the Loughead brothers’ seaplane model, the Model G. The Loughead brothers’ seaplane, the Model G, was built in 1912. After a year The company became dormant, but in 1915 the Loughead brothers bought out the interests of other investors to gain control of the Model G, and that year successfully flew paying passengers at the Panama-Pacific Exposition in San Francisco. With their profits and capital from investors, the brothers formed the Loughhead Aircraft Manufacturing Company in 1916. Although their F-1 flying boat was well designed, sales were poor, and in 1921 the company was liquidated.

With the onset of World War II, Lockheed began its close association with the U.S. military with production of the twin-engine, twin-tail P-38 Lightning fighter interceptor, the only American pursuit aircraft to remain in continuous production throughout the war. In 1943, Lockheed, under the direction of aircraft engineer and designer Clarence L. (“Kelly”) Johnson, established a top-secret division, Advanced Development Projects (ADP), to design a fighter around a British De Havilland jet engine. The result was the P-80 Shooting Star, the first American jet aircraft to enter service in 1945.

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